Debugging Istio

In the article, I’m going to describe what we can do, if we configured our application to use Istio, but it is not working like intended. Originally, I wanted to give a detailed description what problems I encountered during the creation of my webinar and how I fixed them. However, I came to a point where this would be a very long one. I hope that you don’t mind that I shortened it and just describe which tools are available to debug the Istio configuration. In my previous article I described how to configure Keycloak for my webinar. So without further ado, let’s start.

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Author:Olaf Meyer
Tags:openshift, kubernetes, istio, keycloak
Categories:development

In this article, I will show you how to install Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 4.3 (OCP) on VMware vSphere with static IPs addresses using the openshift installer in UPI mode and terraform. In contrast to the official OpenShift 4.3 install documentation, we will not use DHCP for the nodes and will not setup the nodes manually - instead we will use static IP addresses and terraform to setup the virtual machines in our vCenter.

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Author:Zisis Lianas
Tags:openshift, redhat, k8s, kubernetes, terraform, vmware, vsphere, ocp
Categories:container, platform, openshift

So here is another one of our series Installing Blahblahblah on OpenShift. This time it is about getting MongoDB to run on OpenShift - the way recommended and promoted by the MongoDB guys. The whole setup is still in beta stage as indicated on these two entries in Red Hat’s container image catalog. You can get your MongoDB instance up and running on OpenShift. But most of the required steps have to be performed on the command line, contrary to the impression given by MongoDB, Inc that once you get the MongoDB Operations Manager up and running everything can be achieved via this tool’s GUI. Some operations in the Operations Manager simply do not work (yet) on OpenShift.

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Author:Markus Hansmair
Tags:openshift, mongodb
Categories:devops

With the release of OpenShift 4.x Red Hat left no stone unturned (compared to previous 3.x versions). Among many things Minishift became Red Hat CodeReady Containers. Having been a big fan of Minishift I recently wanted to give CodeReady Containers (aka CRC) a try.

Turned out this is not that easy - at least if you want to run CRC on a Linux that does not come from Red Hat (or its community). This article gives instructions for all those people out there who want to run CodeReady Containers on Ubuntu.

Update 2020-12-17: According to this comment on GitHub by one of the maintainers / developers of Red Hat CodeReady Containers the issues with Ubuntu have been resolved in the latest version of CRC.

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Author:Markus Hansmair
Tags:openshift, linux, ubuntu
Categories:devops, linux
Introduction to AWS CDK

AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) is a relatively new kid on the block. It is a tool for defining Infrastructure as Code (IaC) and is considered to be the future successor of AWS CloudFormation.

This article overviews the IaC approach, introduces a reader to the AWS CDK, shows what problems it aims to solve and presents a simple example application implemented with it.

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Author:Alexander Ryndin
Tags:AWS, AWS-CDK, AWS-Lambda, Infrastructure-As-Code
Categories:development

GraphQL is a nice way to publish a highly customizable API. In combination with Spring Boot, which makes development really easy and offers features like database integration and security, you can quickly build your API service from scratch.

This is the second part of the series in which we will create a REST-Service based on Spring Boot which will be translated in a GraphQL Service in the 3rd part of this little series.

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Author:Andy Degenkolbe
Tags:SpringBoot, GraphQL, API, API Transformation, Spring Security
Categories:development

We recently had to install a bunch of applications on a customer’s shiny new OpenShift 3.11 cluster. Among others also GitLab. Turned out getting GitLab up and running on OpenShift is not so easy. What I found on the Internet about installing GitLab on OpenShift was partly outdated and not 100% accurate. Most information was about getting GitLab into a Kubernetes cluster. So I had to adapt these information to the situation in an OpenShift cluster.

This article is the conclusion of all these findings and efforts and gives a step-by-step recipe on how to install GitLab on OpenShift.

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Author:Markus Hansmair
Tags:openshift, gitlab
Categories:devops

One of the most challenging questions in cloud environments is about how secure is my application when its deployed in the public cloud ?
Its no secret that security aspects are much more important in a public cloud than it was in classic environments.
But dont be surprised that many applications even in public cloud dont follow best practice security patterns.
This has several reasons for example time and costs are very high trying to achieve a high security level.
But in fact AWS and Kubernetes offer many options which let you improve your security level without too much effort.
I like to share some of the possibilities that you have when creating a secure AWS EKS cluster.

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GraphQL is a nice way to publish a highly customizable API. In combination with Spring Boot, which makes development really easy and offers features like database integration and security, you can quickly build your API service from scratch.
This is the start of a series from articles showing you the way to a Spring Boot powered REST-Service with an API running Spring Boot and Graphql.

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Author:Andy Degenkolbe
Tags:SpringBoot, GraphQL, API, API Transformation
Categories:development

Under the name of “Managed Kubernetes for AWS”, or short EKS, Amazon offers its own dedicated solution for running Kubernetes upons its cloud platform. The way this is provided is quite interesting: While the Kubernetes Master Infrastructure is offered “as a service” (and also billed separately) the Kubernetes Worker Nodes are simply EC2 instances for which Amazon provides a special setup procedure. These now also offer the potential to use well known AWS features like Autoscaling for Kubernetes workloads.

However, manually setting up this infrastructure is still quite a complex process with multiple steps. To be able to quickly have an EKS Kubernetes Cluster up and running, and also to deploy a software project on it, we created a small helper project that offers the creation of a “turnkey ready” EKS cluster that can be quickly pulled up and also teared down after usage.

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Author:Oliver Weise
Tags:Kubernetes, aws, eks, eksctl
Categories:development