check_logfiles examples

Posted on September 28th, 2009 by lausser

On this page you will find examples for configuration files.

Example 1: Error messages from FCAL-Devices

Usage as nagios-plugin to monitor FCAL-devices on a Solaris system. This is a basic example which scans for patterns in /var/adm/messages.

@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'san',
    logfile => '/var/adm/messages',
    rotation => 'SOLARIS',
    criticalpatterns => [
        'Link Down Event received',
        'Loop OFFLINE',
        'fctl:.*disappeared from fabric',
        '.*Lun.*disappeared.*'
    ],
  });

Example 2: Again, but this time as passive service using send_nsca

Using the following configfile you can run check_logfiles as standalone-script. If error messages are found in the messages file, a summary notification is sent to the NSCA server at the end of the check_logfile run.

$scriptpath = '/usr/bin/nagios/libexec:/usr/local/nagios/contrib';
$MACROS = {
    NAGIOS_HOSTNAME => 'orschgeign.muc',
    CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => 'nagios1.muc',
    CL_NSCA_PORT => 5778
};
$postscript = 'send_nsca';
$postscriptparams = '-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -p $CL_NSCA_PORT$
     -to $CL_NSCA_TO_SEC$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$';
$postscriptstdin = '$CL_HOSTNAME$\t$CL_SERVICEDESC$\t
    $CL_SERVICESTATEID$\t$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$\n';
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'san',
    logfile => '/var/adm/messages',
    criticalpatterns => [
        'Link Down Event received',
        'Loop OFFLINE',
        'fctl:.*disappeared from fabric',
        '.*Lun.*disappeared.*'
    ],
  },
);

Example 3: Again, but this time with a notification for each single hit

If you want a notification every time a line matching one of your patterns is found, use the following modified configfile. Be careful: If you expect hundreds of these lines, your server will be flooded.

$scriptpath = '/usr/bin/nagios/libexec:/usr/local/nagios/contrib';
$MACROS = {
    NAGIOS_HOSTNAME => 'orschgeign.muc',
    CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => 'nagios1.muc',
    CL_NSCA_PORT => 5778
};
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'san',
    logfile => '/var/adm/messages',
    criticalpatterns => [
        'Link Down Event received',
        'Loop OFFLINE',
        'fctl:.*disappeared from fabric',
        '.*Lun.*disappeared.*'
    ],
    options => 'script',
    script => 'send_nsca',
    scriptparams => '-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -p $CL_NSCA_PORT$
     -to $CL_NSCA_TO_SEC$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$',
    scriptstdin => '$CL_HOSTNAME$\t$CL_SERVICEDESC$\t
    $CL_SERVICESTATEID$\t$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$\n',
  },
);

Example 4: Check the correct function of the syslog service

In the following example a message will be sent to the syslog service imediately after check_logfiles starts up. After a delay of 5 seconds (which should be enough for the message to make it into the logfile) the logfile will be scanned for this message. If it cannot be found, this is counted as a critical error.

$scriptpath = '/usr/bin';
$prescript = 'logger';
$prescriptparams = '-t nagios';
$prescriptstdin = 'braver syslog ($CL_DATE_YYYY$-$CL_DATE_MM$
    -$CL_DATE_DD$ $CL_
DATE_HH$:$CL_DATE_MI$:$CL_DATE_SS$)';
$prescriptsleep = 5;
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'syslogworks',
    logfile => '/var/adm/syslog/syslog.log',
    rotation => 'bmwhpux',
    criticalpatterns => ['!nagios:\s+braver\s+syslog'],
    options => 'count',
  },
);

Example 5: Monitoring HP Service Guard

Here we look for typical error messages of the cluster software. The value HPUX of the rotation-parameter means, that both syslog.log and maybe OLDsyslog.log are scanned.

$seekfilesdir = '/lfs/opt/nagios/var/tmp';
$protocolsdir = '/lfs/opt/nagios/var/tmp';
$scriptpath = '/lfs/opt/nagios/nrpe/locallibexec';
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'mcsg',
    logfile => '/var/adm/syslog/syslog.log',
    rotation => 'HPUX',
    criticalpatterns => [
        '.*cmcld: Inbound connection from unconfigured address.*',
        '.*cmclconfd.*Unable to activate keep alive option on
     incomming connection.*',
        '.*inetd.*hacl-cfg/udp: Server failing (looping),
     service terminated.*',
        '.*inetd.*hacl-probe/tcp: accept: Bad file number.*',
        '.*cmcld: Inbound.*message from unconfigured address.*',
        '.*cmcld: Unable to connect to quorum server .*
     It may be down.*',
        '.*cmcld: Failed to receive from quorum server.*',
        '.*cmcld: Connection failure to quorum server.*'
    ],
    warningpatterns => [
        'Cluster Files not in Sync',
    ],
    options => 'protocol,count'
  },
);

Example 6: Monitoring the LVM under HP-UX

In this example we look for typical logical volume manager error messages.

@searches = (
 {
  tag => 'lvm',
  logfile => '/var/adm/syslog/syslog.log',
  rotation => 'HPUX',
  criticalpatterns => [
   '.*vmunix: LVM: vg\[[0-9]*\]: pvnum=.*is POWERFAILED',
   '.*vmunix: SCSI: Read error.*dev:.*errno:.*resid:.*',
   '.*vmunix: LVM:.*PVLink.* Failed! The PV is still accessible.*',
   '.*vmunix: LVM: Restored PV.*',
   '.*vmunix: LVM: Performed a switch for Lun ID.*',
   '.*vmunix: LVM:.*PVLink.*Recovered.*',
   '.*vmunix:.*vxfs:.*vx_metaioerr.*file system meta data read error',
  ],
 },
);

Example 7: Simple monitor for a SUN server’s hardware health

If failures or errors exist in the system, prtdiag -l outputs this information to syslogd. If a corresponding error message is found in the messages file, a defect was detected.

#
#  This config file implements a simple method to monitor the
#  hardware health of a solaris machine.
#  From the prtdiag(1M) manpage:
#  -l    Log output. If failures or errors exist in the system,
#        output this information to syslogd(1M) only.
#  This means, if you run prtdiag and you find something
#  prtdiag-related in the messages file, then there must be
#  an error somewhere in the system.
#
$scriptpath = '/usr/platform/sun4u/sbin';
$prescript = 'prtdiag';
$prescriptparams = '-l';
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'prtdiag',
    logfile => '/var/adm/messages',
    rotation => 'SOLARIS',
    criticalpatterns => 'prtdiag:',
  },
);

Example 8: Monitoring of SUN hardware by sending SNMP-traps

In this example we scan /var/adm/messages for patterns indicating upcoming hardware trouble. In this scenario check_logfiles runs not as a nagios-plugin but as a standalone script, which sends a snmp-trap if matching lines were found. Sending the trap is done by an external script which gets the needed information via environment variables.
Here just one single trap is sent at the end of check_logfile’s runtime. If you want a trap for each single matching line, move the $postscript definition as script definition inside the search.

$MACROS = {
  SNMP_TRAP_SINK_HOST => 'nagios.dierichs.de',
  SNMP_TRAP_SINK_VERSION => 'snmpv1',
  SNMP_TRAP_SINK_COMMUNITY => 'public',
  SNMP_TRAP_SINK_PORT => 162,
  SNMP_TRAP_ENTERPRISE_OID => '1.3.6.1.4.1.20006.1.5.1',
};
$seekfilesdir = '/lfs/opt/nagios/var/tmp';
$protocolsdir = '/lfs/opt/nagios/var/tmp';
$scriptpath = '/lfs/opt/nagios/nrpe/locallibexec';
@searches = (
 {
  tag => 'hwmsgs',
  logfile => '/var/adm/kern.log',
  rotation => 'kern\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}',
  criticalpatterns => [
  # bit error cannot be repaired by the scrubber.
  # take cover.
  '.*Sticky Softerror encountered.*',
  ],
  warningpatterns => [
   # memory crumbling
   'NOTICE: Previously reported error on page \w+\.\w+ cleared',
   # lan calble was pulled
   'WARNING: \w+: fault detected external to device; service degraded',
  ],
  options => 'noprotocol',
 },
);
$postscript => 'send_snmptrap.pl';

Jörg Linge was so kind to contribute the following script:

#! /usr/bin/perl
#
#  send_snmptrap.pl
#
use strict;
use Net::SNMP;
my $hostname = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SNMP_TRAP_SINK_HOST}
    || 'nagios.dierichs.de';
my $version = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SNMP_TRAP_SINK_VERSION}
    || 'snmpv1';
my $community = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SNMP_TRAP_SINK_COMMUNITY}
    || 'public';
my $port = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SNMP_TRAP_SINK_PORT}
    || 162;
my $oid = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SNMP_TRAP_ENTERPRISE_OID}
    || '1.3.6.1.4.1.20006.1.5.1';
 
my ($session, $error) = Net::SNMP->session(
    -hostname     => $hostname,
    -version      => $version,
    -community    => $community,
    -port         => $port      # Need to use port 162
);
if (!defined($session)) {
   printf('ERROR: %s.\n', $error);
   exit 1;
}
my @varbind = ($oid, OCTET_STRING, $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICEOUTPUT});
my $result = $session->trap(
    -enterprise   => $oid,
    -specifictrap => $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICESTATEID},
    -varbindlist  => \@varbind);
$session->close;
exit 0;

Example 9: Monitoring SUN hardware using NSCA

Instead of SNMP-traps one could also report the errors to a nagios server using send_nsca. Here also check_logfiles runs as standalone script.

$scriptpath = '/usr/local/nagios/bin';
$MACROS = {
    NAGIOS_HOSTNAME => 'orschgeign.muc',
    CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => 'nagios1.muc',
    CL_NSCA_PORT => 5778,
    CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE => '/usr/local/etc/send_nsca.cfg',
};
@searches = (
 {
  tag => 'hwmsgs',
  logfile => '/var/adm/kern.log',
  rotation => 'kern\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}',
  criticalpatterns => [
  # bit error cannot be repaired by the scrubber.
  # take cover.
  '.*Sticky Softerror encountered.*',
  ],
  warningpatterns => [
   # memory degrading
   'NOTICE: Previously reported error on page \w+\.\w+ cleared',
   # lan cable was pulled
   'WARNING: \w+: fault detected external to device; service degraded',
  ],
  options => 'noprotocol',
 },
);
$postscript = 'send_nsca';
$postscriptparams = '-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -p $CL_NSCA_PORT$
     -to $CL_NSCA_TO_SEC$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$';
$postscriptstdin = '$CL_HOSTNAME$\t$CL_SERVICEDESC$\t
    $CL_SERVICESTATEID$\t$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$\n';

Example 10: Scan Linux logfiles as an unprivileged user

At the startup of check_logfiles the file attributes of the logfile are modified such that the nagios user can read them.
For this you need an entry in /etc/sudoers:
qqnagio ALL = (root) NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/setfacl
Should the sudo-command fail, then its exitcode of 1 together with the supersmartprescript-option forces check_logfiles to abort with a warning.
If you find the following line in /etc/sudoers
Defaults requiretty
it must be commented out.

$scriptpath = '/usr/bin';
$prescript = 'sudo';
$prescriptparams = 'setfacl -m u:$CL_USERNAME$:r-- /var/log/messages*';
$options = 'supersmartprescript';
@searches = ({
  tag => 'reiserfs',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  rotation => 'SUSE',
  criticalpatterns => [
      'vs-5150: search_by_key:',
      'is_tree_node: node level \d+ does not match to the expected one',
      'vs-500: unknown uniqueness -1',
      'vs-5657: reiserfs_do_truncate: i/o failure',
      'green-16006: Invalid item type observed, run fsck ASAP'],
  ...
});
....

Example 11: Monitoring Apache under Windows for intrusion attempts

Because of the ‘\’ Windows path names have to be set in single quotes.

$MACROS = {
  APACHEDIR => 'C:\Programme\Apache Software Foundation\Apache2.2'
};
@searches = ({
  tag => 'apachebreakin',
  logfile => '$APACHEDIR$\logs\access.log',
  criticalpatterns => [
      'GET.*cmd\.exe.*',
      'SEARCH /\\x90\\x02\\xb1\\x02\\xb1' ]
});

Example 12: Revoke hits with the help of a script

Scripts of type supersmart can help you to take a more accurate look at matching lines and, if necessary, modify them.

@searches =(
  {
    tag => 'heiss',
    logfile => '/var/log/messages',
    criticalpatterns => '.*Thermometer: \d+ Degrees.*',
    options => 'supersmartscript',
    script => sub {
      my $degrees = 0;
      $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICEOUTPUT} =~ /: (\d+) Degrees/;
      $degrees = $1;
      if ($degrees > 86) {
        if (($ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_DATE_MM} >= 6) &&
            ($ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_DATE_MM} <= 8)) {
          printf 'OK - after all, it\'s summer\n'; # dummy msg
          return 0; # this match never happened.
        } elsif (($ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_DATE_MM} >= 11) &&
            ($ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_DATE_MM} <= 2)) {
          printf 'CRITICAL - fire!\n';
          return 2;
        } else {
          printf 'WARNING - a bit warm in here\n';
          return 1;
        }
      } else {
        printf 'OK - below 86 degrees\n';
        return 0;
      }
    }
  }
);

Example 13: Monitoring of Fibre Channel Links

Using the type “virtual” one can monitor files in the /proc or /sys directory. In the following example the cable is pulled from an Emulex LPe1150 adapter.

nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host0/model
ServeRAID 8i
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host1/modeldesc
Emulex LPe1150-F4 4Gb 1port FC: PCIe SFF HBA
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host2/modeldesc
Emulex LPe1150-F4 4Gb 1port FC: PCIe SFF HBA
.
.
.
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host0/state
running
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host1/state
Link Up - Ready:
   Fabric
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host2/state
Link Up - Ready:
   Fabric
.
.
.
@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'host0',
    logfile => '/sys/class/scsi_host/host0/state',
    type => 'virtual',
    criticalpatterns => [
      '^[^running]+'
    ],
    options => 'nologfilenocry,noprotocol',
  },
  {
    tag => 'host1',
    logfile => '/sys/class/scsi_host/host1/state',
    type => 'virtual',
    criticalpatterns => [
      'Link [^Up]+'
    ],
    options => 'nologfilenocry,noprotocol',
  },
  {
    tag => 'host2',
    logfile => '/sys/class/scsi_host/host2/state',
    type => 'virtual',
    criticalpatterns => [
      'Link [^Up]+'
    ],
    options => 'nologfilenocry,noprotocol',
  },
);
.
.
.
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> check_logfiles -f linux_fs_check_fcal.cfg
OK - no errors or warnings |host0=1;0;0;0 host1=2;0;0;0 host2=2;0;0;0
.
.
.
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> cat /sys/class/scsi_host/host2/state
Link Down
.
.
.
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> check_logfiles -f linux_fs_check_fcal.cfg
CRITICAL - (1 errors) - Link Down  |host0_lines=1
     host0_warnings=0 host0_criticals=0
     host0_unknowns=0 host1_lines=2 host1_warnings=0
     host1_criticals=0 host1_unknowns=0 host2_lines=1
     host2_warnings=0 host2_criticals=1 host2_unknowns=0

Example 14: Forwarding of the Windows Eventlogs to a Unix-Syslogserver

If a messages file is composed of multiple servers’ events, because you forward the Windows eventlog to a Unix system, using the syslogclient option allows a directed search for messages coming from a specific Windows system.

@searches = ({
  tag => 'exchange1.dom',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  rotation => 'SUSE',
  criticalpatterns => [
     'An MTA database server error was encountered',
  ],
  options => 'syslogclient=exchange1.dom'
},
{
  tag => 'exchange2.dom',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  rotation => 'SUSE',
  criticalpatterns => [
     'An MTA database server error was encountered',
  ],
  options => 'syslogclient=$CL_TAG$'
  });
....

Example 15: Searching the AIX errpt

AIX writes many messages in the so called Error Report which can be readout with the errpt command. With type=errpt you can instruct check_logfiles to scan errpt’s output instead of a real logfile.

@searches = (
 {
   tag => 'minor_errors',
   type => 'errpt',
   criticalpatterns => ['ADAPTER ERROR',
       'The largest dump device is too small.',
       'The copy directory is too small.',
       'Kernel heap use exceeds allocation count',
       'Kernel heap use exceeds percentage thres',
       'LINK ERROR',
       'Permanent fatal error',
       'SCSI BUS OR DEVICE ERROR',
       'SCSI DEVICE OR MEDIA ERROR',
       'Possible malfunction on local adapter',
       'ETHERNET DOWN',
       'UNABLE TO ALLOCATE SPACE IN KERNEL HEAP'
    ],
 }
);

Example 16: Windows EventLog forwarding with templates

If there are messages originating from different syslog clients in a logfile, they can be prefiltered with the name of such a client. To avoid definitions for each single client, you can use templates.

define command {
  command_name  check_client_logs
  command_line     $USER2$/check_logfiles --tag=$HOSTNAME$ \
      --logfile='/var/log/messages' \
      --criticalpattern='$ARG1$' --syslogclient='$CL_TAG$'
}
define service {
  service_description dr_watson
  host_name  pc0815.muc
  check_command check_client_logs!4097.*generated an application error
}

With templates you can formulate multiple searches in one configfile and pick only specific ones according to the type of the host. Without templates you would have to write a definition for each host.

@searches = (
{
  template => 'drwatson',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  criticalpattern => '4097.*generated an application error',
  options => 'syslogclient=$CL_TAG$'
},
{
  template => 'virus',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  criticalpattern => 'a virus was found',
  options => 'syslogclient=$CL_TAG$'
},
{
  template => 'cluster',
  logfile => '/var/log/messages',
  criticalpatterns => ['5029.*The cluster  log is corrupt',
      '5038.*A cluster resource failed', ],
  options => 'syslogclient=$CL_TAG$'
});

For “normal” Windows-Clients you would run:

check_logfiles --config <configdatei> --tag='pc0815' \
    --selectedsearches='drwatson,virus' \

And for cluster servers:

check_logfiles --config <configdatei> --tag='clustsrv1.muc'

Example 17: Oracle Alertlog

Oracle databases write their error messages into an alert log. Paying attention to these messages helps you detect potential problems before they cause a production outage. (please also refer to type => “oraclealertlog”)

@searches = ({
  tag => 'oraalerts',
  logfile => '......../alert.log',
  criticalpatterns => [
      'ORA\-0*204[^\d]',        # error in reading control file
      'ORA\-0*206[^\d]',        # error in writing control file
      'ORA\-0*210[^\d]',        # cannot open control file
      'ORA\-0*257[^\d]',        # archiver is stuck
      'ORA\-0*333[^\d]',        # redo log read error
      'ORA\-0*345[^\d]',        # redo log write error
      'ORA\-0*4[4-7][0-9][^\d]',# ORA-0440 - ORA-0485 background process failure
      'ORA\-0*48[0-5][^\d]',
      'ORA\-0*6[0-3][0-9][^\d]',# ORA-6000 - ORA-0639 internal errors
      'ORA\-0*1114[^\d]',        # datafile I/O write error
      'ORA\-0*1115[^\d]',        # datafile I/O read error
      'ORA\-0*1116[^\d]',        # cannot open datafile
      'ORA\-0*1118[^\d]',        # cannot add a data file
      'ORA\-0*1122[^\d]',       # database file 16 failed verification check
      'ORA\-0*1171[^\d]',       # datafile 16 going offline due to error advancing checkpoint
      'ORA\-0*1201[^\d]',       # file 16 header failed to write correctly
      'ORA\-0*1208[^\d]',       # data file is an old version - not accessing current version
      'ORA\-0*1578[^\d]',        # data block corruption
      'ORA\-0*1135[^\d]',        # file accessed for query is offline
      'ORA\-0*1547[^\d]',        # tablespace is full
      'ORA\-0*1555[^\d]',        # snapshot too old
      'ORA\-0*1562[^\d]',        # failed to extend rollback segment
      'ORA\-0*162[89][^\d]',     # ORA-1628 - ORA-1632 maximum extents exceeded
      'ORA\-0*163[0-2][^\d]',
      'ORA\-0*165[0-6][^\d]',    # ORA-1650 - ORA-1656 tablespace is full
      'ORA\-16014[^\d]',      # log cannot be archived, no available destinations
      'ORA\-16038[^\d]',      # log cannot be archived
      'ORA\-19502[^\d]',      # write error on datafile
      'ORA\-27063[^\d]',         # number of bytes read/written is incorrect
      'ORA\-0*4031[^\d]',        # out of shared memory.
      'No space left on device',
      'Archival Error',
  ],
  warningpatterns => [
      'ORA\-0*3113[^\d]',        # end of file on communication channel
      'ORA\-0*6501[^\d]',         # PL/SQL internal error
      'ORA\-0*1140[^\d]',         # follows WARNING: datafile #20 was not in online backup mode
      'Archival stopped, error occurred. Will continue retrying',
  ]
});

Example 17a: Oracle RAC Clusterware Alertlog

Daniel Graef sent in this example for the monitoring of an Oracle Clusterware Alertlog. Thanks a lot!

@searches = (
{
  tag => 'racnode01-clusterware',
  logfile => '/oracle/app/crs/product/111_1/log/racnode01/alertracnode01.log',
  criticalpatterns => [
      'CRS\-1006[^\d]', # The OCR location %s is inaccessible. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1008[^\d]', #  Node %s is not responding to OCR requests. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1009[^\d]', #  The OCR configuration is invalid. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1011[^\d]', #  OCR cannot determine that the OCR content contains the latest updates. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1202[^\d]', #  CRSD aborted on node %s. Error [%s]. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1203[^\d]', #  Failover failed for the CRS resource %s. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1205[^\d]', #  Auto-start failed for the CRS resource %s. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1206[^\d]', #  Resource %s went into an UNKNOWN state. Force stop the resource using the crs_stop -f command and restart %s.
      'CRS\-1207[^\d]', #  There are no more restart attempts left for resource %s. Restart the resource manually using the crs_start command.
      'CRS\-1402[^\d]', #  EVMD aborted on node %s. Error [%s]. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1602[^\d]', #  CSSD aborted on node %s. Error [%s]. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1606[^\d]', #  CSSD Insufficient voting files available [%s of %s]. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1608[^\d]', #  CSSD Evicted by node %s. Details in %s.  [local node eviced, critical for node himself]
      'CRS\-1609[^\d]', #  CSSD detected a network split. Details in %s.
  ],
  warningpatterns => [
      'CRS\-1010[^\d]', #  The OCR mirror location %s was removed.
      'CRS\-1604[^\d]', #  CSSD voting file is offline: %s. Details in %s.
      'CRS\-1607[^\d]', #  CSSD evicting node %s. Details in %s. [local evicted other node, warning for clsuter state]
      'CRS\-2001[^\d]', #  memory allocation error when initiating the connection failed to allocate memory for the connection with the target process
      'CRS\-2003[^\d]', #  error %d encountered when connecting to %s
      'CRS\-2004 [^\d]', # error %d encountered when sending messages to %s
      'CRS\-2005[^\d]', #  timed out when waiting for response from %d
      'CRS\-2006[^\d]', #  failed to get response from %d
  ],
  options => 'sticky=86400'
});

Example 18: IPMI System Event Log

This example shows how to look for power supply problems by reading the IPMI System Event Log with the ipmitool sel list command.

@searches = (
  {
    tag => 'powercable',
    type => 'ipmitool',
    ipmitool => { # you don't need this if you are root
      path => 'sudo /usr/bin/ipmitool',
    },
    criticalpatterns => [
        'Power Supply.*Failure detected',
        'Power Supply AC lost',
     ],
  });
nagios@ibmsrv05:/> check_logfiles -f ibm_power.cfg
CRITICAL - (6 errors in test.protocol-2008-02-12-14-19-36) -
      190 ; 02/07/2008 ; 14:28:13 ; Power Supply #0x39 ;
     Failure detected ...|
     powercable_lines=17 powercable_warnings=0
     powercable_criticals=6 powercable_unknowns=0

Example 19: Passive Checkresults which cannot be assigned

Passive Checkresults, which cannot be assigned a host or a service (e.g. because of a typo) are silently dropped (Apart from a notice in nagios.log). With this method, Nagios is able to send out a notification if this occurs. This was Augustinus’ idea.

$MACROS = {
  NAGIOS_LOGFILES => '/var/nagios'
};
@searches = {
  tag => 'nagios_unmatched_passive_check_results',
  logfile => '$NAGIOS_LOGFILES$/nagios.log',
  archivedir => '$NAGIOS_LOGFILES$/archives',
  rotation => 'nagios-\d{2}-\d{2}-\d{2}-\d{2}.log',
  criticalpatterns => [
      '^\[\d+\] Warning:  Passive check result was received for service .* on host .* but the service could not be found',
      '^\[\d+\] Warning:  Passive check result was received for service .* on host .* but the host could not be found',
  ],
};

54 Responses to “check_logfiles examples”

  1. selcuk Says:
    December 28th, 2009 at 16:37

    Hi,

    Example 10: Scan Linux logfiles as an unprivileged user

    The above example can be a security hole.. So the following can be done :

    in (Redhat systems)

    [root@nagios logrotate.d]# cat /etc/logrotate.d/syslog /var/log/messages /var/log/secure /var/log/maillog /var/log/spooler /var/log/boot.log /var/log/cron { … /usr/bin/setfacl -m u:nagios:rx /var/log/messages endscript }

    The above config must be done just 1 time.. after this it will set nagios acl correctly..

    you can see file perms as getfacl /var/log/messages You must see nagios user in output with rx rights…

    By the way thanks for the scirpt…

    lausser Reply:

    Thanks for that. I always found the prescript/setfacl method a bit ugly, but i had some enterprises in mind, where the admins prefer to grant sudo-privileges (which is done frequently) that to edit files in /etc (which is practically never done, because they install from an image and want to keep their servers identical). But integrating your method in an installation image is definitively a good idea.

    progre55 Reply:

    @lausser, First off, thanks for the plugin =) I need to monitor tomcat logs on a linux machine (Ubuntu), but having problems with permissions. However, the setfacl solution didnt work, as it says “Operation not supported”. Any other better/secure ideas, please?

    lausser Reply:

    Seems your filesystem does not allow acl operations. Either because of the filesystem type or because it’s not allowed. Look at the mount-options and remount the filesystem. (something like mount -oacl )

    progre55 Reply:

    @lausser, Well, it’s an Ubuntu server on amazon aws, and I wouldn’t want to re-mount it.. are there any other ways, than acl?

  2. Ovidiu Says:
    January 8th, 2010 at 9:01

    The examples are really great! Thank you.

    Could it be possible to have the Example 10 with all the critical and warning patterns? Thanks in advance.

    lausser Reply:

    I’m sorry, the patterns in the example are all i know. The “…” does not mean that i was just too lazy to write down a complete list.

  3. Mihael Says:
    March 15th, 2010 at 21:47

    Hi, How should be configured service.cfg on Nagios server if I want to use send_nsca(Example 2) on remote machine?

  4. Jim Says:
    May 7th, 2010 at 10:43

    Hi, do you have an example config to check MS SQL Server logs, in particular the rotation settings as I have not been able to get this working on a Windows 2003 server running SQL Server 2005. Thanks

    lausser Reply:

    I don’t know how your logfiles are organised. Maybe this will work?

    @searches = ({
        logfile => 
    'C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL.1\MSSQL\LOG\ERRORLOG',
        rotation => 'loglog0log1', # equal to 'ERRORLOG\.\d+'

  5. Jim Says:
    May 7th, 2010 at 13:43

    Hi,

    I have resolved my issues, the SQL log file is Unicode so setting the option = ‘encoding=ucs-3′ fixed my problem

    lausser Reply:

    Ah, ok. Are you sure it’s ucs-3? Not ucs-2?

  6. Ryan Says:
    May 13th, 2010 at 20:35

    Anyone know the correct format for send_nsca to include the $CL_SERVICEPERFDATA$ in a manner that allows something like PNP4NAIOGS to automatically grab it?

    Not sure that I want to use it but I am curious at how useful the graphs would be over time.

  7. Ryan Says:
    May 13th, 2010 at 21:13

    Sorry to spam… Is there anyway to make a global critical/warning exception within the config file? I am looking at crit.log. We have hundreds of explicit ignore (exceptions) that I need to account for in my various @search conditions. I really don’t want to have to put all the suppress conditions in each condition. I am having to do this because our logic requires that last condition to be a “catch all” which allows anything else not explicitly suppressed through as a ticket. Is the best solution just including the exceptions on that last “catch all” condition?

    lausser Reply:

    Maybe like this?

    $globalexceptions = [
      'except1', 'except2', .....
    ];
    ...
    @searches = ({
        criticalexceptions => $globalexceptions,
    }, {
        criticalexceptions => $globalexceptions,
    }, {
    ...

    Ryan Reply:

    @lausser, perfect…

  8. Ryan Says:
    May 18th, 2010 at 21:28

    Two technical questions regarding the check_logfiles cfg files. I am working to migrate away from a vendor product.

    1. We have conditions in our current tool that dictate I need X number of matches over Y time. I see I can use options “count” and “savethresholdcount”. What I don’t see is a way to implement a sliding window of time to compare that “count” to. Any ideas?

    2. Some of our existing conditions take pieces from the matched text to be included in our alert text (very much like the $1 .. $n in regex). Is there anyway to capture those values during the match and make them available with a predefined macro?

    Thanks so much for your time.

    lausser Reply:

    There is no such think like sliding window in check_logfiles. Maybe you can implement it by using the “supersmartscript” ans “supersmartpostscript” options. Rewriting the message text can be done with a supersmartscript, where the handler calls the matching operator and adds brackets to the regular expression.

  9. M. Bloch Says:
    May 26th, 2010 at 16:12

    Hi,

    at first many thanks thanks for the plugin :).

    I use Nagios 3 with Fedora 12 and I try to compile the plugin with

    ./configure –prefix=/usr/lib/nagios/plugins –with-nagios-user=nagios –with-nagios-group=nagcmd –with-perl=/usr/bin –with-gzip=/usr/bin –with-trusted-path=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin –with-seekfiles-dir=/tmp –with-protocols-dir=/tmp

    make

    make install

    I get no error message during compiling. But when I execute the plugin with

    ./check_logfiles

    i get the message:

    -bash: ./check_logfiles: /usr/bin/: bad interpreter: Keine Berechtigung

    Does anybody have an idea why i get the message?

    thx a lot

    M. Bloch Reply:

    @M. Bloch,

    i got it :)

    the Firstline in the check_logfiles was wrong. There was #! /usr/bin/ -w

    i just add perl after bin/ an d now it works :)

    lausser Reply:

    --with-perl=/usr/bin
    This means: use the Perl interpreter /usr/bin, which of course does not exist. It must be
    --with-perl=/usr/bin/perl
    But as long as you want to use the default perl (/usr/bin/perl) it is not necessary to use –with-perl. The configure script will find the right one automatically.
  10. crankytexan Says:
    August 4th, 2010 at 0:56

    How do I have the output show more then just the last row? I have a config file that looks for the right patterns, but because there are 15 lines after that it only prints what is on the line where the alert is. Can I concatenate the line with say 8 lines below where the error occurs?

    lausser Reply:

    with criticalpatterns=>’.*’ and supersmartscripts you can implement this. Look at the examples how you can code your own logic.

  11. crankytexan Says:
    August 9th, 2010 at 21:20

    I am new at this so please excuse my multiple questions and I greatly appreciate the help.

    So another issue is I want each line in the pattern under the criticalpatterns to output when an alert comes through. In other words if I have under critical patterns:

    criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ],

    I need to see each one of those. Currently I am only seeing the last pattern.

    Also I have multiple logs in the config file and it is adding those together and outputting the last pattern. There is a count of how many criticals for each log, but I need to know each error for each log:

    @searches = ( { tag => ‘Log A’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\server.net.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, { tag => ‘Log B’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\server.netb.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, );

    Example return when running manually in a cmd prompt:

    CRITICAL – (6 errors in logconfig.protocol-2010-08-09-14-49-12) – Object reference not set to …|Log A_Lines=4 Log A_warnings=0 Log A_criticals=3 Log A_unknowns=0 Log B_lines=4 Log B_warnings=0 Log B_criticals=3 Log B_unknowns=0

    crankytexan Reply:

    @crankytexan,

    Please excuse the above formatting. I thought I had put it in correctly, but the @searches came across weird. Should look like (if it comes out right):

    @searches = ( { tag => ‘Log A’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\server.net.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, { tag => ‘Log B’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\server.netb.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, );

    lausser Reply:

    $options = 'report=long';
    @searches = ( {
      tag => 'Log A', 
      logfile => 'c:\\Temp\\server.net.log', 
      criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 
        'Error retrieving portfolio', 
        'Object reference not set to' 
      ], 
    }, { 
      tag => 'Log B', 
      logfile => 'c:\\Temp\\server.netb.log', 
      criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 
        'Error retrieving portfolio', 
        'Object reference not set to' 
      ], 
    }, );
    looks okay

    (except the duoble-backslash. it must be just a single one, but my editor is bad)

    lausser Reply:

    Use the global option ‘report’

    $options = 'report=long';
    It will output multiple lines with one line per hit.

    crankytexan Reply:

    @lausser,

    Unfortunately that didn’t work. I still get the same output. Would running this on a Windows box make a difference?

  12. crankytexan Says:
    August 12th, 2010 at 17:40

    So when I use the above config file I get this return. I know that all of the above alerts are in the test logfile because I put them in there, but it is only returning one of the alerts and is telling me how many are in each tag. How do I get it to spit out for each alert and show the tags separately? I am so close to completing our checks, but I have no reference her because no one has used this plugin at my company. Below is the return when running from a command line:

    H:\>perl “c:\nsclient++\PlugIns\check_logfiles” -f “c:\NSClient++\PlugIns\dearconfig.cfg”

    CRITICAL – (8 errors in dearconfig.protocol-2010-08-12-11-26-22) – No messages h ave been received from the remote host for the specified time period. …|Sydney Dear Logs_lines=6 Sydney Dear Logs_warnings=0 Sydney Dear Logs_criticals=5 Sydn ey Dear Logs_unknowns=0 Dear Logs EMEA OF_lines=5 Dear Logs EMEA OF_warnings=0 D ear Logs EMEA OF_criticals=3 Dear Logs EMEA OF_unknowns=0

    I added what you stated above to the config file (please excuse the formatting if it comes across wrong):

    $options = ‘report=long'; @searches = ( { tag => ‘Sydney Dear Logs’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\dear.server.net.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, { tag => ‘Dear Logs EMEA OF’, logfile => ‘c:\Temp\dear.server.netb.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'No messages have been received from the remote host for the specified time period.', 'Error retrieving portfolio', 'Object reference not set to' ], }, );

  13. Stefan Says:
    October 12th, 2010 at 10:57

    Hallo, verstehe nicht warum, das postscript nicht ausgeführt wird. Sollte doch alles stimmen, oder?

    Grüße Stefan

    $scriptpath = ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca'; $MACROS = { CL_NSCA_DELIMITER => ‘,’, CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => ‘192.168.138.88’ }; $postscript = ‘send_nsca.exe'; $postscriptparams = ‘-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -d $CL_NSCA_DELIMITER$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$'; $postscriptstdin = ‘$CL_HOSTNAME$,$CL_SERVICEDESC$,$CL_SERVICESTATEID$,$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$';

    @searches = ( { tag => ‘test1′, logfile => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\log.txt’, criticalpatterns => [ '222', '555' ], }, );

    lausser Reply:

    Es fehlt noch

    $options = 'postscript';
    Das Vorhandensein von $postscript allein reicht nicht, man muss explizit per Option einschalten, dass es auch ausgeführt wird.

    Stefan Reply:

    @lausser,

    Danke für die schnelle Antwort. Habe es hinzugefügt, aber leider wird das postscript nicht ausgeführt…. Ist noch ein Fehler vorhanden?

    Grüße

    $scriptpath = ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca'; $postscript = ‘send_nsca.exe'; $postscriptparams = ‘-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -d $CL_NSCA_DELIMITER$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$'; $postscriptstdin = ‘$CL_HOSTNAME$,$CL_SERVICEDESC$,$CL_SERVICESTATEID$,$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$'; $options = ‘postscript'; $MACROS = { CL_NSCA_DELIMITER => ‘,’, CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => ‘192.168.138.88’ }; @searches = ({ tag => ‘test1′, logfile => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\log.txt’, criticalpatterns => [ '222', '555' ], }, );

    Stefan Reply:

    @Stefan, Jetzt habe ich dieses Configfile versuch, leider auch hier keinen Erfolg. Send_nsca funktioniert händisch. Ich komme leider nicht weiter.

    $scriptpath = ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca'; $options = ‘postscript'; $MACROS = { CL_NSCA_DELIMITER => ‘,’, CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => ‘192.168.138.88’ }; @searches = ({ tag => ‘test1′, logfile => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\log.txt’, criticalpatterns => [ '222', '555' ], options => ‘postscript’, postscript => ‘send_nsca.exe’, postscriptparams => ‘-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -d $CL_NSCA_DELIMITER$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$’, postscriptstdin => ‘$CL_HOSTNAME$,$CL_SERVICEDESC$,$CL_SERVICESTATEID$,$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$’, }, );

    lausser Reply:

    Das geht nicht. $postscript etc. muss ausserhalb der searches-Definitionen liegen. Das mit dem Text “Habe es hinzugefügt, aber leider….” sieht gut aus. Du müsstest eine Environmentvariable %TEMP% haben, die auf ein temporäres Verzeichnis zeigt. In diesem Verzeichnis legst du eine leere Datei namens check_logfiles.trace an. Wenn du dann check_logfiles nochmal aufrufst, wird da ein Haufen Debugginginfo reingeschrieben, u.a. der (versuchte) Aufruf von send_nsca.exe.

    Stefan Reply:

    @lausser,

    Sehr gut, hier ist der Fehler: Die send_nsca.cfg verweist auf ein Unix-Dir, aber es ist eine Windose.

    Tue Oct 12 13:45:53 2010: execute C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca\send_nsca.exe -H 192.168.138.88 -d , -c /usr/local/nagios/etc/send_nsca.cfg

    Also fix das passende Macro gesetzt: CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca\send_nsca.cfg’

    -> Es klappt. Vielen Dank, Gerhard! Btw: Das Postscript läuft auch ohne “$options = ‘postscript';”. Ist das so gewollt?

    lausser Reply:

    Da musste ich grad selber nochmal nachschauen. Tatsächlich reicht es, wenn $postscript vorhanden ist. Die $options braucht man nur, wenn man ‘smartpostscript’ (return/exitcode des Postscripts wird als weiterer Critical/Warning gezählt) oder ‘supersmartpostscript’ (return/exitcode des Postscripts bestimmt das Endergebnis von check_logfiles, egal ob vorher schon Fehlermeldungen im Logfile gefunden wurden oder nicht) angibt.

    Stefan Reply:

    @lausser, Die komplette Konfig-Datei:

    $scriptpath = ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca'; $options = ‘postscript'; $postscript = ‘send_nsca.exe'; $postscriptparams = ‘-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$'; $postscriptstdin = ‘$CL_HOSTNAME$\t$CL_SERVICEDESC$\t$CL_SERVICESTATEID$\t$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$\n'; $MACROS = { CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => ‘192.168.138.88’, CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca\send_nsca.cfg’ }; @searches = ({ tag => ‘test1′, logfile => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\log.txt’, criticalpatterns => [ '222', '555' ], }, );

  14. Stefan Says:
    October 12th, 2010 at 11:49

    Hello! The Pattern is found, but no postscript ist executed. Please help me finding the problem within this configfile. Regards Stefan

    $scriptpath = ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\send_nsca'; $MACROS = { CL_NSCA_DELIMITER => ‘,’, CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS => ‘192.168.138.88’ }; $postscript = ‘send_nsca.exe'; $postscriptparams = ‘-H $CL_NSCA_HOST_ADDRESS$ -d $CL_NSCA_DELIMITER$ -c $CL_NSCA_CONFIG_FILE$'; $postscriptstdin = ‘$CL_HOSTNAME$,$CL_SERVICEDESC$,$CL_SERVICESTATEID$,$CL_SERVICEOUTPUT$';

    @searches = ( { tag => ‘test1′, logfile => ‘C:\temp\check_logfiles\log.txt’, criticalpatterns => [ '222', '555' ], }, );

  15. Paul Kilgour Says:
    November 23rd, 2010 at 13:02

    Hi, thanks very much for the script. It works great for me using one server but now I have 2 servers monitoring the same log files for failover reasons. Is there a way for each to keep a track of new lines in the log rather than them both using each others. i.e. I need them both to report on the same errors found. Currently one will check the file, see there is an error, then the 2nd server will check the log and report back as ok because it only checks from the lines that the other server checked up to. Sorry for my bad explanation but hopefully you understand.

    Many thanks,

    Paul

    lausser Reply:

    check_logfiles uses a so-called seekfile to keep track of it’s actions. There it saves for example the position in the logfile where the last scan ended. At the beginning of the next run check_logfiles reads that position from the seekfile and starts scanning the logfile from this position. I wonder why two check_logfiles on two separate machines do not work completely independent from each other, as each one should have it’s private seekfile. By default the seekfile is saved in /var/tmp/check_logfiles/ (can be changed by setting the variable $seekfilesdir in the config file). So there should be two seekfiles, one on each of the two machines. I only can explain the behaviour you’re observing with a seekfile in a shared location. Did you set $seekfilesdir to point to a directory in a cluster-filesystem?

  16. mr.h Says:
    January 15th, 2011 at 20:34

    Finde vor allem den $NAGIOS_HOSTNAME super! :)

  17. sdouce Says:
    February 14th, 2011 at 17:57

    Hello , First thanks you for your plugin ! My question is i would like to use the check_logfile command to do something like that :

    ./check_logfiles –logfile=”/path/to/file.log” –config=ALERTLOG.cfg

    This way i can control many different logfile with identical config file …? Do you know if its possible ?

  18. outremont Says:
    February 23rd, 2011 at 19:49

    Guten Tag Ich hab 2 logfiles welche ich auf ein Eintrag prüfen muss. Leider befinden sich die Logs in anderen Ordner!

    Zudem reicht es mir wenn nur eine Datei den Eintrag besitzt, bzw. er muss nicht in beiden Dateien erscheinen.

    Gibt es eine mögichkeit dies abzufragen?

    Gruss Outremont

    Ich hab folgendes Skript, welches nur ein OK bringt wenn beide Dateien den Eintrag haben:


    logfile monitoring

    #

    DBExport logfile


    $seekfilesdir = ‘C:\\groundwork\\temp'; @searches = ( { tag => ‘DBExport Logfile’, logfile => ‘D:\\backup\\oracle\\full\\posdb\\monday\\log\\exp_monday.log’, criticalpatterns => [ '!Export erfolgreich ohne Warnungen beendet.'

        ],

    options           =&gt; 'protocol'
    

    },

    { tag => ‘DBExport Logfile’, logfile => ‘D:\\backup\\oracle\\full\\posdb\\tuesday\\log\\exp_tuesday.log’, criticalpatterns => [ '!Export erfolgreich ohne Warnungen beendet.'

        ],

    options           =&gt; 'protocol'
    

    },

    );

  19. Matt Hawkins Says:
    March 11th, 2011 at 22:20

    Lausser,

    I’m trying to figure out how the timeout works. I’m trying to get the check_logfiles script to die after 60 seconds. I’ve use the “-t 60″ option but it doesn’t seem to work. I’m sure I’m doing something wrong or I misunderstand what it is used for.

    Thanks in advance as always.

  20. Hernan Fonseca Says:
    March 31st, 2011 at 18:04

    Lausser, Im trying this to catch some events ID in the application event log on Windows

    @searches = ( { options => ‘eventlogformat=”%w src:%s id:%i %m”‘, tag => ‘evt_app’, type => ‘eventlog’, eventlog => { eventlog => ‘application’, include => { source => ‘BizTalk Server 2006′, eventid => ['5429','5410','6912','6913','5753','10034','7184','5439','7221','5649','5773','5888','5777','5697','5652','5743','5740'], }, }, criticalpatterns => ‘.*’, });

    The problem is, that i wanna catch all events Id =5429 or all events ID =5410, or all events Id=6912 , and so on….

    how could be the best way to do that with out making all in separates files of course.

    thanks in advance

  21. Rahul Says:
    May 23rd, 2011 at 22:01

    Hi Lausser,

    I am using this plugin for a while now and am facing a problem right now, Here is how my configuration file looks like,

    @searches = (

    #

    Pattern1

    # { tag => ‘Pattern1′, logfile => ‘/var/tmp/logfile1-log4j.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'FATAL', 'Item limit per service exceeded', 'java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space', 'ParserException', ], criticalexceptions => [ 'RESCODE=IDNOTFOUND', ], options => ‘sticky=900,noprotocol,nologfilenocry,supersmartscript’, script => sub { ( my $line = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICEOUTPUT}) =~ s/\|/\;/g; print “$line found in $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_LOGFILE}”; return $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICESTATEID}; } },

    #

    Pattern2

    # { tag => ‘Pattern2′, logfile => ‘/var/tmp/logfile2-log4j.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'FATAL', 'ParserException', ], options => ‘sticky=900,noprotocol,nologfilenocry,supersmartscript’, script => sub { ( my $line = $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICEOUTPUT}) =~ s/\|/\;/g; print “$line found in $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_LOGFILE}”; return $ENV{CHECK_LOGFILES_SERVICESTATEID}; } },

    );

    I have 20-30 such entries in given file. The problem is, even though the pattern match occurs in any of the logfiles, the logfile name displayed is always the last pattern.

    e.g. In above configuration, if their is one line found with ‘FATAL’ pattern in Pattern1 section, the alert text would still show the logfile name as /var/tmp/logfile2-log4j.log instead of /var/tmp/logfile1-log4j.log

    do you see any issues with the way I am setting this up.

    Thanks!

    Rahul Reply:

    @Rahul, Could you please look into this request. -Rahul.

  22. Erik Johansson Says:
    July 11th, 2011 at 17:07

    Hi. I am testing this and running a check from Linux to the Windows computer (NSClient++) I get this: erik@ubuntu:/etc/icinga$ /usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_nrpe -H 192.168.1.170 -c check_logfiles Unrecognized character \x90; marked by <– HERE after MZ<– HERE near column 3 at C:\Program Files\NSClient++\scripts\check_logfiles.exe line 1. Is this something wrong with the .exe, like the error message says? I dowloaded it today from this site. Or is it Perl? I installed via ActiveState Perl64, 5.14.1.1401 I have this in NSC.ini under [External Scripts]: check_logfiles=C:\Perl64\bin\perl.exe “C:\Program Files\NSClient++\scripts\check_logfiles.exe” -f “C:\Program Files\NSClient++\scripts\check_logfiles.cfg” Any ideas? Thanks.

    Erik Johansson Reply:

    I went back to this and it works now, I have relative paths instead for the command and no Perl: check_logfiles=scripts\check_logfiles.exe -f scripts\check_logfiles.cfg I can’t recall if have changed anyting else.

  23. Malik Says:
    July 14th, 2011 at 20:11

    Thanks for the very useful plugin, is there a possibility to provide logfile as a parameter to config file. I dont want to use logfile on command line it doesnt provide those extra features. So what I am is sending the filename as a parameter to config file –config.

    THanks

  24. Mike Says:
    October 21st, 2011 at 21:54

    Hi,

    I installed the check_logfiles plugin to a system running Nagios 3.3.1 and used a config file to set protocolsdir and seekfilesdir to /home/nagios/tmp I changed the owner of the /home/nagios/tmp folder to nagios:nagios Also in the config file I defined this search:

    @searches = ( { tag => ‘mem’, logfile => ‘/u02/reporthome/logs/Engine.log’, criticalpatterns => [ 'java.lang.OutOfMemoryError', 'Java heap space' ], });

    Then in the nrpe.cfg file I defined the command using –tag and –config

    What I see in Nagios for the status of this service is: NRPE: Unable to read output

    Do you have any suggestions?

    Thanks,

    Mike

  25. docker_cap Says:
    October 26th, 2011 at 12:15

    Hi, I want to check, if a pattern contained in a logfile. If the pattern is in the logfile I want to have an OK Status. My idea was the construct: criticalpatterns => [ '!pattern1', '!pattern2' ]. If I use easy patterns such like one word it works great for me, but if I want to search for more complex pattern such like ‘!abc def ghi’ it seems that this construct does not work correct. Could you pls. give me a suggestion, which syntax I have to use? Many Thanks, Kind Regards docker_cap

  26. David Fisher Says:
    November 7th, 2011 at 21:32

    I am building a monitoring configuration for an application in windows that writes log files. I found your plugin and downloaded the Check_logfiles.zip which looks like it contains the windows executable. When I run the program against a very simple test log file (looking for ‘Critical’ in a line I always get everything is OK nothing is found. Do I need to compile the program from the tar download or is there another windows executable? Thank you.

    lausser Reply:

    As soon as a new error message appears in your logfile, the status will be CRITICAL